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Organización de Solidaridad con los Pueblos de Asia, Africa y América Latina (OSPAAAL) posters:

The Organización de Solidaridad con los Pueblos de Asia, Africa y América Latina (OSPAAAL) or Organisation for Solidarity with the People of Africa, Asia and Latin America was founded in Havana in January 1966 after the Tricontinental Conference, a meeting of leftist delegates from Guinea, the Congo, South Africa, Angola, Vietnam, Syria, North Korea, the Palestinian Liberation Organisation, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Chile and the Dominican Republic. Alongside its campaigning work and the publication of the journal Tricontinental it also produced Cuban propaganda posters until ink shortages prevented this in the mid-1980s (although printing did begin again in 2000).

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[Africa dollars] / Olivio Martinez [Havana : OSPAAAL, 1975]

africa dollars

This poster depicts a rapacious figure clad in the United States flag transforming the blood squeezed from the African continent into dollars. There is disagreement over its production date, with OSPAAAL themselves claiming it to be 1971, whilst the University of California's 'Cuban Poster Art' catalogue suggests it is in fact 1975. Given the subject matter in would seem more likely to be the latter, as it was only by the mid-1970s that Africa's debt crisis emerged as a significant international issue.Please click the image for an enlarged view of the poster.

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60 / Rolando Córdoba [Havana : OSPAAAL, 1977]

sixty

This poster was produced to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the 1917 Russian Revolution. This choice of subject is likely to have been influenced by the strengthening of ties between Cuba and the Soviet Union which occurred in the 1970s.Please click the image for an enlarged view of the poster.

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Uruguay : freedom for political prisoners / Rafael Enriquez [Havana : OSPAAAL, 1980]

Uruguay

The text of the title here appears in English, Spanish, French and Arabic. Uruguay was ruled by a military government from 1973 to 1985, whose policy of 'preventive repression' meant that by 1976 the country had the most political prisoners per capita in the world. As this regime was strongly pro-Western and anti-communist it is easy to see why those it imprisoned would find support in Cuba..Please click the image for an enlarged view of the poster.

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World solidarity with the Cuban Revolution / Victor Manuel Navarrete. [Havana : OSPAAAL, 1980]

world solidarity

The text of the title here appears in English, Spanish, French and Arabic. This is in keeping both with the sentiments of the poster and the international market OSPAAAL appealed to through Tricontinental, which often contained posters as their centrefolds. The attack on the United States may have been in part a response to US propaganda following the emigration of 125 000 Cubans in the 'Mariel boat lift' incident in 1980. Please click the image for an enlarged view of the poster.

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Day of the heroic guerrilla, October 8 / Olivio Martinez. [Havana : OSPAAAL, 1978]

heroic guerilla

The text of the title here appears in English, Spanish, French and Arabic. This is one of many posters commemorating the anniversary of the death of Che Guevara (formerly one of the leaders of the Cuban Revolution) in Bolivia on October 8th 1967. An idealised image is used, in contrast to portrayals both of Guevara before his death and of other living leaders, which tend to be much more realistic.Please click the image for an enlarged view of the poster.

 

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Go home : Sept. 23 Day of Solidarity with Puerto Rico / Heriberto Echevarría. [Havana : OSPAAAL, 1971]

go home

The text of the title here appears in English, Spanish, French and Arabic. The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico remains part of the territory of the United States, and consequently the issue of independence has intermittently mobilised Puerto Rican and international public opinion. In 1971 the army took possession of the majority of Culebra Island, and it is likely to have been the expansion of the US military presence in Puerto Rico that provides the background for this poster.Please click the image for an enlarged view of the poster.

 

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